Balaring Mangrove Park

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Located in the city of Silay, Balaring Mangrove Park is a coastal reforestation program of the city government of Silay in cooperation with the Japanese group called “Ikaw-Ako Japan – Negros Partnership for Environment Protection”.

The partnership was made possible through Professor Yorihisa Goto of Nihon Fukushi University and Lieutenant Yunichuro Doi an officer of the Japanese Imperial Army during the second world war.  Doi escaped to Patag at the height of the American campaign to free Negros from the Japanese forces.

This mangrove forest park is managed by the local residents of Balaring specifically the Mangrove Planters Association who also worked closely with the city government of Silay.  The members oversee the planting, protection and maintenance of the mangrove forest park.

If you tour the place, you will be able to see those mangrove trees growing abundantly from the entrance of the mangrove park up to the coastal area of Balaring facing the Strait of Guimaras.  Species of mangroves like Bakhaw, Pagatpat, and Bungalon are abundant in the park.

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The bamboo bridge that starts at the entrance of the mangrove forest park, extends up to the coast.  The bridge gives the visitors an opportunity to appreciate the mangroves when they begin navigating the whole area using the bamboo bridge.

Along the way, there are rest houses that visitors can use to relax.  A restroom is also available in the area.  A lookout or a tower made of bamboo and lumber had been constructed to enable the visitors to see the expanse of the whole mangrove forest park as well as appreciate the view of the Strait of Guimaras. An entrance fee is collected by the management of the park.

For those who are planning to visit the area, please be advised to bring a black plastic bag for your rubbish.  Let us keep the mangrove forest park free of garbage.

On my first visit, I had to rush to reach the coastal area but the rain stopped me when I reached the curve portion of the bridge.  I decided to return to the entrance where there are houses so I can stay out of the rain.

My visit to Balaring Mangrove Forest Park was brief, very brief, but it gave me an idea that when the community and local leaders unite to protect the coastal areas as well as provide shelter and spawning area for all aquatic life and even provide sanctuary for the birds, then the whole project can succeed.

Balaring Mangrove Park is located at Barangay Balaring, Silay City, in the province of Negros Occidental. Continue reading

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Model of Environmental & Social Impact Assessment Report of a BRT System Project

Introduction

The Bus Rapid Transit System or BRT is designed to lessen traffic congestion in urban centers as well as decrease travel time from one point to the next therefore increasing productivity in all sectors of the society such as: social sector and economic sector among others.

In this post, Earthniversity shares the Final Report as of February 14, 2015 of the Dar es Salaam Bus Rapid Transit System Project which is also known as DART or  Dar es Salaam Rapid Transit.

“Dar es Salaam, is located on a natural harbour on the Eastern Indian Ocean coast of Africa, about 45 km (28 mi) south of the island of Zanzibar. The city is the main port of entry to Tanzania and the transportation hub of the country.  Dar es Salaam has a population of more than 4.3 million people living in its metropolitan area (Dar es Salaam Region). Spoken languages are English (official) and Swahili (national).

Source:

http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/map/google_map_Dar_es_Salaam.htm

Aerial photo of Dar es Saalam City, Tanzania. Photo Credit: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

For details of this Report, please open this link stated hereunder.

http://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/afdb/Documents/Environmental-and-Social-Assessments/Tanzania_-_Dar_es_Salaam_BRT_Project_ESIA_Phase_2_3_Report_-_04_2015.pdf

Disclaimer:

Earthniversity does not claim ownership of this Final Report on Tanzania’s Dar es Salaam Bus Rapid Transit System.  It is produced by Kyong Dong Engineering Co., Ltd. in association with Ambicon Engineering(T) Limited.

References:

  1. http://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/afdb/Documents/Environmental-and-Social-Assessments/Tanzania_-_Dar_es_Salaam_BRT_Project_ESIA_Phase_2_3_Report_-_04_2015.pdf
  2. http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/map/google_map_Dar_es_Salaam.htm
  3. Photo of Muhammad Mahdi Karim

MOTHER EARTH SONG

Earthniversity

In the celebration of Earth Day on April 22, 2015, Earthniversity would like to re-post this video. Hoping that this will inspire the readers to engage in activities that can protect and conserve the environment.

For LGUs (local government units) and communities around the world, the following programs and projects can be implemented in your local community to support the Earth Day celebration. These are the following:

1. Tree planting in selected areas which were identified by your local environment office.  This included mangroves tree planting.

2. Clean-up Drive along the coastal areas, river sides, creeks, waterways, parks, forest areas frequented by tourists who left the rubbish there.

3. Conduct of information, education and community consultation, workshop, or symposium on topics relevant to the protection and conservation of the environment.

4. Other activities you deem fit for your local community.

Earthniversity would like to recognize BlueGreenEarth for uploading this video…

View original post 60 more words

Current Issues on Urban Metabolism & Harvard University Graduate School of Design Lectures, Part 3 of 3.


Source: Youtube. This video is not owned by Earthniversity but by Harvard University Graduate School of Design in connection with their lectures on Projective Views on Urban Metabolism which they uploaded and published on youtube on February 14, 2014. Thank you HUGSD for sharing this video/lectures with all interested people on planet Earth.

Comment:

Urban Metabolism has always fascinated me. I came to know about this in 2000 when I was attending a short course on Designing Sustainable Development under the Master in Urban Management Program in the University of Canberra in Australia. Since then, I got hooked by it because of its relevance to urban planning and design. Its idea of treating urban area or as I would like to use it – human settlement – like a human body that metabolizes, is really relevant in the development, planning and designing of cities and urban areas. But what is Urban Metabolism?

WHAT IS URBAN?
The word urban refers to or pertains to a city, or belonging to a city. (Wikipedia)

WHAT IS METABOLISM?

“Metabolism (from Greek: μεταβολή metabolē, “change”) is the set of life-sustaining chemical transformations within the cells of living organisms. These enzyme-catalyzed reactions allow organisms to grow and reproduce, maintain their structures, and respond to their environments. The word metabolism can also refer to all chemical reactions that occur in living organisms, including digestion and the transport of substances into and between different cells, in which case the set of reactions within the cells is called intermediary metabolism or intermediate metabolism.” (Wikipedia)

WHAT IS URBAN METABOLISM? The Wikipedia has a nice explanation on this:

“Urban metabolism is a model to facilitate the description and analysis of the flows of the materials and energy within cities, such as undertaken in a Material flow analysis of a city. It provides researchers with a metaphorical framework to study the interactions of natural and human systems in specific regions.[1] From the beginning, researchers have tweaked and altered the parameters of the urban metabolism model. C. Kennedy and fellow researchers have produced a clear definition in the 2007 paper ‘’The Changing Metabolism of Cities’’ claiming that urban metabolism is “the sum total of the technical and socio-economic process that occur in cities, resulting in growth, production of energy and elimination of waste.” [2] With the growing concern of climate change and atmospheric degradation, the use of the urban metabolism model has become a key element in determining and maintaining levels of sustainability and health in cities around the world. Urban metabolism provides a unified or holistic viewpoint to encompass all of the activities of a city in a single model.”

THE HARVARD UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN VIDEO ON URBAN METABOLISM

In my research about Urban Metabolism, I encountered this video on youtube about “Projective Views on Urban Metabolism” presented by the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. It caught my attention very greatly that I wish to share this to our readers. I do not claim to be an expert on this topic because I am also a “student”, a searcher just like the rest of us.

This is the explanation of HUGSD on this video which focuses on the main topic entitled: The Agency of Design.

“DDes Conference: Projective Views on Urban Metabolism (Part 3)In the last two decades, the concept of urban metabolism, aiming to grasp the continuous processes of energy, material and population exchange within and between cities and their extensive hinterlands, has been subject of both extensive empirical research and, increasingly, critical discussion within the social and natural sciences. However, these interdisciplinary challenges have not yet been met with a synthetic response from the design disciplines. The goals of this one-day conference are, through the lens of urban metabolism, to: generally reassess the planetary rescaling of contemporary urbanization processes; unpack the transformation of spatial forms and structures and subsequently, the emergence of new operative territories for design; explore the agency of design in confronting these challenges.”

This is the last part (Part 3 of 3) of the lectures conducted by HUGSD on Projective Views on Urban Metabolism. This portion is about The Agency of Design. The speakers are the following:

1. Dr. Mitchell Joachim. He is Co-Founder of TerreForm One. He is also an Associate Professor at New York University. He will talk about their research on TerreForm One.

2. Chris Reed is an Associate Professor in Practice of Landscape Architecture at HUGSD. His research interest includes The Impact of Ecological Science on Design Thinking and City Making Strategies in Form by Landscape Systems and Dynamics.

3. Ila Berman is connected with the University of Waterloo College of Architecture. She is a Doctor of Design Graduate from HUGSD. Her research topic is: Investigate the Relationship Between Culture and Evolution of Contemporary Materials and Spatial Practices.

Moderator: Hashim Sarkis

Toastmasters are: Daniel, Nickos and Pablo.

Citations:

Earthniversity would like to thank the Harvard University Graduate School of Design for uploading this video on youtube. We hope our followers and team members have gained so much knowledge from this sharing on the topic about Projective Views on Urban Metabolism. Again thank you HUGSD and youtube. These videos, Part I, II, and III are available here at Earthniversity blogsite and these are also available on youtube. Thank you everyone….

Current Issues on Urban Metabolism & Harvard University Graduate School of Design Lectures, Part 2 of 3.

Urban Metabolism has always fascinated me. I came to know about this in 2000 when I was attending a short course on Designing Sustainable Development under the Master in Urban Management Program in the University of Canberra in Australia. Since then, I got hooked by it because of its relevance to urban planning and design. Its idea of treating urban area or as I would like to use it – human settlement – like a human body that metabolizes, is really relevant in the development, planning and designing of cities and urban areas. But what is Urban Metabolism?

WHAT IS URBAN?
The word urban refers to or pertains to a city, or belonging to a city. (Wikipedia)

WHAT IS METABOLISM?

“Metabolism (from Greek: μεταβολή metabolē, “change”) is the set of life-sustaining chemical transformations within the cells of living organisms. These enzyme-catalyzed reactions allow organisms to grow and reproduce, maintain their structures, and respond to their environments. The word metabolism can also refer to all chemical reactions that occur in living organisms, including digestion and the transport of substances into and between different cells, in which case the set of reactions within the cells is called intermediary metabolism or intermediate metabolism.” (Wikipedia)

WHAT IS URBAN METABOLISM? The Wikipedia has a nice explanation on this:

“Urban metabolism is a model to facilitate the description and analysis of the flows of the materials and energy within cities, such as undertaken in a Material flow analysis of a city. It provides researchers with a metaphorical framework to study the interactions of natural and human systems in specific regions.[1] From the beginning, researchers have tweaked and altered the parameters of the urban metabolism model. C. Kennedy and fellow researchers have produced a clear definition in the 2007 paper ‘’The Changing Metabolism of Cities’’ claiming that urban metabolism is “the sum total of the technical and socio-economic process that occur in cities, resulting in growth, production of energy and elimination of waste.” [2] With the growing concern of climate change and atmospheric degradation, the use of the urban metabolism model has become a key element in determining and maintaining levels of sustainability and health in cities around the world. Urban metabolism provides a unified or holistic viewpoint to encompass all of the activities of a city in a single model.”

THE HARVARD UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN VIDEO ON URBAN METABOLISM

In my research about Urban Metabolism, I encountered this video on youtube about “Projective Views on Urban Metabolism” presented by the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. It caught my attention very greatly that I wish to share this to our readers. I do not claim to be an expert on this topic because I am also a “student”, a searcher just like the rest of us.

Earthniversity does not own this video but is thankful to Harvard University Graduate School of Design for uploading and sharing this on youtube, so that interested people around the planet could learn from this topic – Urban Metabolism. This video was published on youtube on February 14, 2014.

This is the description of the video according to HUGSD.
Published on Feb 14, 2014

“DDes Conference: Projective Views on Urban Metabolism (Part 2)In the last two decades, the concept of urban metabolism, aiming to grasp the continuous processes of energy, material and population exchange within and between cities and their extensive hinterlands, has been subject of both extensive empirical research and, increasingly, critical discussion within the social and natural sciences. However, these interdisciplinary challenges have not yet been met with a synthetic response from the design disciplines. The goals of this one-day conference are, through the lens of urban metabolism, to: generally reassess the planetary rescaling of contemporary urbanization processes; unpack the transformation of spatial forms and structures and subsequently, the emergence of new operative territories for design; explore the agency of design in confronting these challenges.”

This is Part 2 of the lecture series and the following are the speakers for this session – Territorial Transformation:

1. Lola Sheppard – Topic: Territorial Metabolisms: Far Flung Metabolisms. Lola is Partner Lateral Office and Associate Professor, University of Waterloo
2. Salvador Rueda – Topic: Urban Metabolism. Salvador is Urban Ecologist. He is Founder and Director of Urban and Ecology Agency of Barcelona. He specializes in Planning and Analysis of Complex Systems.
3. Jane Hutton and Kiel Moe – “Material and Energy Ecologies”. Jane and Kiel are Asst. Professors of Harvard University, Graduate School of Design. Jane is with Landscape Architecture Department while Kiel is with Architecture Department. Both co-Direct, Energy Environment and Design Research Lab.
4. Moderator – Pierre Belanger

Toastmasters: Daniel, Nickus and Pablo

Citations:
1. Harvard University Graduate School of Design for uploading this video on youtube for all the people of the world to watch.

Comment:

This post comes in 3 parts. This is Part 2, so the next part will be part 3 of 3. Please watch for it here at Earthniversity under the label “Classroom”. These are also available on youtube.

Current Issues on Urban Metabolism & Harvard University Graduate School of Design Lectures, Part 1 of 3.

Urban Metabolism has always fascinated me. I came to know about this in 2000 when I was attending a short course on Designing Sustainable Development under the Master in Urban Management Program in the University of Canberra in Australia. Since then, I got hooked by it because of how it was used in urban planning and design. Its idea of treating urban area or as I would like to use it – human settlement – like a human body that metabolizes, is really relevant in the development, planning and designing of cities and urban areas. But what is Urban Metabolism?

WHAT IS URBAN?
The word urban refers to or pertains to a city, or belonging to a city. (Wikipedia)

WHAT IS METABOLISM?

“Metabolism (from Greek: μεταβολή metabolē, “change”) is the set of life-sustaining chemical transformations within the cells of living organisms. These enzyme-catalyzed reactions allow organisms to grow and reproduce, maintain their structures, and respond to their environments. The word metabolism can also refer to all chemical reactions that occur in living organisms, including digestion and the transport of substances into and between different cells, in which case the set of reactions within the cells is called intermediary metabolism or intermediate metabolism.” (Wikipedia)

WHAT IS URBAN METABOLISM? The Wikipedia has a nice explanation on this:

“Urban metabolism is a model to facilitate the description and analysis of the flows of the materials and energy within cities, such as undertaken in a Material flow analysis of a city. It provides researchers with a metaphorical framework to study the interactions of natural and human systems in specific regions.[1] From the beginning, researchers have tweaked and altered the parameters of the urban metabolism model. C. Kennedy and fellow researchers have produced a clear definition in the 2007 paper ‘’The Changing Metabolism of Cities’’ claiming that urban metabolism is “the sum total of the technical and socio-economic process that occur in cities, resulting in growth, production of energy and elimination of waste.” [2] With the growing concern of climate change and atmospheric degradation, the use of the urban metabolism model has become a key element in determining and maintaining levels of sustainability and health in cities around the world. Urban metabolism provides a unified or holistic viewpoint to encompass all of the activities of a city in a single model.”

THE HARVARD UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN VIDEO ON URBAN METABOLISM

In my research about Urban Metabolism, I encountered this video on youtube about “Projective Views on Urban Metabolism” presented by the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. It caught my attention very greatly that I wish to share this to our readers. I do not claim to be an expert on this topic because I am also a “student”, a searcher just like the rest of us.

Earthniversity does not own this video but is thankful to Harvard University Graduate School of Design for uploading and sharing this on youtube, so that interested people around the planet could learn from this topic – Urban Metabolism. This video was published on youtube on February 14, 2014.

This is the description of the video according to HUGSD.

“DDes Conference: Projective Views on Urban Metabolism (Part 1)
In the last two decades, the concept of urban metabolism, aiming to grasp the continuous processes of energy, material and population exchange within and between cities and their extensive hinterlands, has been subject of both extensive empirical research and, increasingly, critical discussion within the social and natural sciences. However, these interdisciplinary challenges have not yet been met with a synthetic response from the design disciplines. The goals of this one-day conference are, through the lens of urban metabolism, to: generally reassess the planetary rescaling of contemporary urbanization processes; unpack the transformation of spatial forms and structures and subsequently, the emergence of new operative territories for design; explore the agency of design in confronting these challenges.”

There are several speakers who will tackle various topics. The videos come in three parts. This is Part I – Metabolic Upscaling. Hereunder is the list of Speakers and their Topics:

1. Jason W. Moore – “Metabolic Shift or Metabolic Rift”.
Moore is connected with the Department of Sociology, Fernand Braudel Center, Birmingham University.

2. Erle Ellis – “Ecologies of the Anthropocene, Global Upscaling of Social-Ecological Infrastructures”. Ellis is connected with Geography & Environmental Systems, University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

3. Timothy W. Luke will deliver a Commentary on Urban Metabolism. Luke is Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of Political, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Virginia.

4. Matthew Gandy will talk about Circulations of Metabolisms. Gandy is Professor of Geography at the University College of London and many other connections.

5. Moderator: Neil Brenner
Toastmasters: Daniel and Nickus.

Citations:
1. Harvard University Graduate School of Design for uploading this video on youtube for all people of the world to watch.

Comment:

This post comes in 3 parts. This is Part 1, so the next post will be parts 2 and 3. Please watch for the next post here at Earthniversity and also labeled under “Classroom”. These are also available on youtube.